Kenny Hawkins with the Muziki Roberson Quartet
March 19 – 7:30-10 pm

jazz club! when lights are low… every Saturday night

photo by Angela Bennett

photo by Angela Bennett

Bassist Aaron Germain and drummer Alcide Marshall join Kenny Hawkins (flute, sax) and Duane Muziki Roberson (piano) for two sets of top-flight jazz.

Muziki Roberson’s distinct style and creative individuality have placed him among the most respected musicians in the Bay Area. It’s been said that “Muziki’s music and playing will move you at the very depths of your being.” His breathtaking compositions are always characterized by the hippest of rhythms and the deepest elements of swing.

Muziki arrived in the Bay Area in 1968 after 4 years in the Army, 22 years old with the firm idea that he wanted to be a musician, having met and become close to drummers Michael Carvin and George Suronovich in Viet Nam. George, who passed away some years ago, played with the rock group “Love.” Michael and Muziki remain friends, have played together and plan to do so again at some point. Both of these musicians had a large influence on Muziki, who went to college on the G.I. bill and studied music theory and composition.  As a pianist, Muziki is self-taught.

photo by Angela Bennett

photo by Angela Bennett

Kenny Hawkins, flutist, saxophonist and composer, has led and performed in various jazz, Afro-Cuban, and R&B contexts for more than 25 years, beginning as a drummer in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, picking up the flute early and heading to Seattle where he joined the Joe Brazil big band and became a member of legendary tenor player Hal Stein’s jazz workshop, gaining a firm grounding in the be-bop tradition. He then came to California where he was mentored by trumpeter Eddie Henderson and saxophonist Hadley Caliman. During this time, Kenny composed for and led a group that periodically featured Eddie Henderson, Richard Kermode (the great pianist for Carlos Santana), Hadley Caliman and guitarist Ray Obiedo, playing also with the likes of guitarist Calvin Keys and trombonist, Julian Priester. Although his first instrument is flute, he readily doubles on tenor saxophone, playing each with equal verve and depth.

Bassist Aaron Germain and drummer Alcide Marshall round out the quartet — both players with resumes that won’t quit and both of whom we’ve heard to fantastic effect on the Bird & Beckett stage.

The return of Muziki and Ken to the Bird & Beckett stage in the company of Aaron and Alcide will surely be an exciting and satisfying night of jazz for your pleasure.