Friday, November 20th – 5:30-8:00 pm
The Scott Foster Quartet
plumbs the depths of John Scofield

scott fosterGuitarist Scott Foster is joined this evening by James Mahone, tenor sax; Sam Bevan, bass; and Brandon Etzler, drums, for an excursion through the work of a guitarist that influenced Scott profoundly early on and retains a fascination still.

Scofield himself characterizes his music as falling in a continuum of post-bop, funk edged jazz, and R & B. According to the bio on his site, Scofield was born in Ohio and raised in suburban Connecticut, took up the guitar at age 11, inspired by both rock and blues players, and attended Berklee College of Music in Boston. fAter a debut recording with Gerry Mulligan and Chet Baker, he joined the Billy Cobham-George Duke band for two years. In 1977 he recorded with Charles Mingus, and joined the Gary Burton quartet. He began his international career as a bandleader and recording artist in 1978. From 1982–1985, Scofield toured and recorded with Miles Davis, an experience that placed him firmly in the foreground of jazz consciousness as a player and composer.

Since the mid-1980s Scofield has led his own groups in the international jazz scene, and has recorded over 30 albums as a leader — including collaborations with Pat Metheny, Charlie Haden, Eddie Harris, Medeski, Martin & Wood, Bill Frisell, Brad Mehldau, Mavis Staples, Government Mule, Jack DeJohnette, Joe Lovano and Phil Lesh. He’s played and recorded with Tony Williams, Jim Hall, Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Joe Henderson, Dave Holland and Japanese trumpeter Terumasa Hino, among many jazz legends. Throughout his career Scofield has punctuated his traditional jazz offerings with funk-oriented electric music. All along, the guitarist has kept an open musical mind.

This evening, Scott Foster will explore what that mind has offered him these many years.  Scott is a magnificent player, among the very best musicians Bird & Beckett has had the pleasure to present these many years.  Come out Friday evening for some fine and interesting jazz and a ton of good company. You’ll be glad you did.