Thursday, March 21st at 7 p.m.
POETS! H. D. Moe & Cesar Love
Jerry Ferraz, M.C.
open mic follows

David MoeH. D. Moe (born 16 Nov. 1937) is considered one of the most important of the “baby beat” poets, with over 30 books of poetry to his credit.  Living in Berkeley, California, Moe has served as editor and publisher of Beatitude Press, Embassy Hall Press and Deserted X Press, and as editor of the Berkeley Review of Books.  Among his more recent publications are a book of philosophy (How To Be God Now) and two volumes of poetry (Always Home and Birth To Birth).   A living legend, H. D. Moe is currently working on a new book about a real and imaginary journey called Royal Poetopia and The Wild Law Civilization.  Come out to Bird & Beckett and catch the master.  H.D.Moe’s website is found at http://www.hdmoe.com/

Cesar Love fotoWe are also graced to present Cesar Love, celebrated poet and educator, a Latino poet influenced by the Asian masters, a revitalizing voice on the poetry scene speaking to us of the streets, peoples, and natural environs of the real San Francisco.  His is a poetry of the history and magical beauty of its landscape and vital culture.  A resident of San Francisco’s Mission District, he has taught creative writing to individuals who receive general assistance.  Cesar’s new book is While Bees Sleep, from CC. Marimbo Press.

Regarding While Bees Sleep, poet Jack Hirschman, San Francisco Poet Laureate Emeritus, has written that it is “Brilliant in its discretions in dealing with the 10,000 things of the world.  The poems are like a narrative written in haikuistic epiphanies.  Depths throughout, exemplified by my favorite, “Twilight.”  An excellent book of poetry.”  And Alejandro Murguia, Poet Laureate of San Francisco, has said of the book and its poems, “Precise and condensed as haikus, as tasty as pomegranates, the poems turn on a dime to reveal insights luminous as street lights on an urban night.”

A footnote:  The photo of H. D. Moe above is from Maureen Hurley’s blog (is she perhaps the photographer as well?) at http://mohurley.blogspot.com/2009/09/black-bart-rides-again.html.  There, you’ll find a wonderful account with stunning images from the Black Bart Poetry Festival held at the On Broadway Theatre in North Beach in 1983, with Dave Moe in attendance, among a cast of luminaries that will make you regret ever missing a promising gathering of bards.  The post begins with the well-told tale of Black Bart, himself, “California’s first and most notorious stagecoach robber poet” and quotes a commentator who noted that “whatever Black Bart lacked as a rhymer, he sure made up for as a robber.”  If you think poetry is a crime, you’re not alone!  But crime pays, just like poetry, no?  Bring a dollar or two for the poets!